Thursday, May 14, 2009

Vintage Thingie Thursday


I love thinking about what I might photograph for Thursdays. Today I was working in my sewing room and decided that I wanted to show some of my feed sacks and related stuff.

For those of you who may not know what a feed sack is ....

Feed sacks came about in the early 1900's as a off white colored onasburg sack for carrying dry goods such as seed,fruit,flour,sugar etc. As manufactures noticed the women who had access to these bags began reusing them for everything from towels to underwear (remember we were in the never waste anything era of time) they began to manufacture the bags in prints for use by homemakers. I started collecting them to use in quilting.

It was this quilt that got the whole thing started for me. In the process of collecting enough feed sack prints to make the 1600 leaves on this quilt I met the "feed sack lady " of the time and joined a club she ran for collectors.

This was a wining quilt from the 1930 Chicago Fair.
Yes in fact mine is in progress and has been for several years.

Well it just multiplied from there. I now house over 600 sacks and various related objects. This may be an ongoing vintage post.


As you can see they came in different color ways of the same print.


This is an example of how they would of come to use for a flour towel. remove the string that held the bag closed add a seam all the way around and you have a great cotton towel.

Here are a few from my collection of those with labels.This is an example from 1940's where a kitchen knife came inside with the product.

This is a example of two things. First the bag was pieced together. As the run of fabric was done they just added another on at that point and still made a bag out of it. It is also considered a novelty fabric as it has characters on it.


This is an example of a geometric. It also has the manufacture on the label. Chase was a major mill which manufactured bags.



I didn't realize how much time this would take just to get this much posted. There is so much more I want to show. Stayed tuned for next week and I will post more of the different types of prints available. Be sure and visit The Colorado Lady for more vintage finds.

Enjoy your day.

Rhonda

14 comments:

Susan said...

Wonderful collection of feedsacks. And a beautiful quilt that got you started.

This simple Life said...

Oh no don't make me wait until next week! I really enjoyed your post and want more.

Heather said...

Wonderful post! I just posted yesterday about my love for reproduction feed sack fabric, and my VTT today is a tablecloth made from feedsacks and ric rac! You have such a beautiful collection, and I can't wait to see more!

Elizabeth said...

This was really interesting. I knew about feed sacks, but not all the different patterns and colors. I look forward to you sharing more. I also LOVE that yellow quilt! I can see why it is such an inspiration for you.

Marie Reed said...

This is just fascinating! I had NO idea that they came in printed fabrics too. I am so excited to learn more and will be biting my nails in anticipation of next weeks post!

LV said...

Anything to do with quilts, I love. Never made one, but want all I see. Uou just have to git looking.

Postcardy said...

I like the combination of the label and fabric. I knew they used those sacks for flour, but I didn't know they used them for feed too.

Donna said...

nice post..sure wish I knew how to tell what feedsack look like

CC said...

Oh my!!!!! What a collection..how I would love to have so many wonderful fabrics as this. I loved your post, can't wait to see more. Just beautiful.. Happy VTT..have a great weekend.

Sarah said...

I can remember drying dishes with feed sack towels...they didn't leave lint on your crystal!

Bea said...

I look and look for feedsack. Never find them. That quilt is amazing!

My lovely 86 year old neighbor made and sold aprons from ham bags.

farmlady said...

This is a wonderful thing to collect. I love the old feed sack logos.
My mom had Osnaburg drapes make for our house when we were kids. They still hang in the living room. It's a very sturdy fabric; lasts forever.

Thanks for an interesting VTT post.

Miri said...

Wonderful post...please show us more! While I've seen lots of feedsack quilts and some feedsacks-this is the first time with the labels! Thanks!

Coloradolady said...

I am so interested in how One finds 600 plus feedsacks in the condition yours are in? I have two...TWO...and am always looking for more. Great post today, can not wait for more on this .....fun! Thanks for participating in VTT. Sorry, my comment was late, I have been out of town.